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No man is an island

  1. 1. Paste Between Multiple Files
  2. 2. Paste For One File

Command Paste Reference

Paste is mainly used for processing text files. As all known, stdin can also be treated as a file.

Paste Between Multiple Files

The command paste file1 file2 will give a result where each line contains corresponding lines of every operand file delimited by a tab. And to designate delimiter of your own, simply use a -d option like this: paste -d'/' file1 file2.

To do the trick of “paste” multiple files with similar names, apply wildcards like this: paste file*

To better illustrate its function, let’s look at an example:

a.txt the file contains:

1
2
3
4

b.txt is as follows:

a
b
c
d

And the command paste -d ',' a.txt b.txt gives the result:

1,a
2,b
3,c
4,d

Paste For One File

By default, paste operation on one file sees each line as an atom manipulative unit. That is, taking each line as a single file.

There is also -d option working just like what it is for in multiple-file circumstance.

And there is special usage under this circumstance. To get it across clearer, let’s look at another example:

A text file labeled data.txt contains this:

China
Chinese
Chile
Unknown
Brazil
DontknowEither
Ameriaca
English

For command paste -d',' - - < data.txt, the output is:

China,Chinese
Chile,Unknown
Brazil,DontknowEither
America,English

And for paste -d',' - - - < data.txt, we get this:

China,Chinese,Chile
Unknown,Brazil,DontknowEither
America,English

Look at and learn from the differences between these two commands and outputs, which are easily understandable enough.

This article was last updated on days ago, and the information described in the article may have changed.